Chocolate Chess Pie

Chocolate Chess Pie

  Although a Chess Pie is not much to look at, it is a truly decadent recipe using only humble ingredients from the pantry. A diamond in the rough, so to speak. It makes me feel like a queen when I indulge in a slice of this gooey, fudge bomb of a pie. It doesn’t matter that I am trapped in the house with my teenagers who make me want to pull every hair out of my head. This pie is like Calgon, it takes me away from all of their bickering, demanding of snacks, t.v. time, sulking and pouting.  I take a bite and savor a brief moment of solitude, locked in my office before they come knocking on the door, yelling , “Mo-om! Where are you???”

  No need to go to the supermarket for supplies, social distancing and wiping down carts, you likely have everything you need for this sweet treat already in your pantry. So, Keep Calm and Bake On.

chocolate pie topped with whipped cream and mug

Chocolate Chess Pie

makes one 9″ pie

1 unbaked pie shell (pie crust recipe to follow)

1/2 cup butter

2 (1) ounce squares unsweetened chocolate OR 6 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa and 2 tablespoons oil

1 cup firmly packed brown sugar

2 eggs, beaten

1 teaspoon flour

1 tablespoon milk

1 teaspoon vanilla

1/8 teaspoon salt

Preheat oven to 325 degrees.

Melt butter and chocolate in a small sauce pan over low heat. Remove and allow to cook for at least 5 minutes. In a medium sized bowl, combine sugar, eggs, flour, milk, vanilla and salt. Gradually add chocolate mixture and stir to combine. Pour into pie shell and bake for 40-45 minutes until puffed and cracked on top. Let cool for 20 minutes or so before serving or serve at room temperature. Top with whipped cream, ice cream or whatever your taste buds require.

Pie Crust

(makes enough for 2 pie shells)

2 cups flour, plus extra for rolling

2/3 cup Crisco

4 tablespoons cold butter, cubed

pinch of salt

1/2 cup cold water

Place flour in medium sized mixing bowl. Add Crisco, cubed butter and salt. Combine using 2 forks or a pastry cutter until mixture resembles small peas. Make a well in the center and slowly add water, gently stirring to combine. Add only enough water to bring mixture together. Pat crust into a ball and cut into 2 pieces. Flatten pieces into discs and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate up to one day, until ready to roll out. Or freeze for up to a few months. For the Chess Pie, roll out one disk, place in pie plate, crimp edges, pour filling into pie shell and bake.

 

 

Blood Orange Pie

fresh cut blood oranges and juicer

The first time I made this pie, I followed the original instructions which included the pith and the skin of the oranges and the lemon.  And it was oh, so bitter.  But in spite of the fact that I do not like bitter orange flavors like marmalade and such, I persisted and ate all of the pie, a small slice per day, until it was gone.  Not because I am stubborn, prideful and refuse to let my hard work go to waste (all these points are true), but because of the real reason: the crust was exquisite and shame on anyone who wastes a crisp, flaky homemade pie crust.  Shame on them. Continue reading

Tomato Pie with Cheddar Cheese and Whole Wheat Crust

fresh tomato pie with herbs, cheddar cheese and a whole wheat crust

What to do with all of the local tomatoes that I have been waiting so long for? I wish they ripened a little at a time so that I didn’t feel rushed to enjoy them all! But here we are in mid August when the tomatoes seem to be ripening faster than anyone can possibly eat them all. This recipe for tomato pie helps. The whole wheat crust lends a bit of cracker type texture which keeps the crust from getting soggy from too much tomato moisture. And who doesn’t love some sharp cheddar cheese with tomatoes? I cannot resist. Make this pie as a side to go with dinner, for lunch to go with a green salad or for breakfast as it is the perfect accompaniment to softly scrambled eggs. I also like it cold right out of the refrigerator the next day, if there is any leftover, like a slice of super fancy cold pizza.

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